Maori Tattoos South Burlington VT

This page provides relevant content and local businesses that can help with your search for information on Maori Tattoos. You will find informative articles about Maori Tattoos, including "Maori / Polynesian tattoos". Below you will also find local businesses that may provide the products or services you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in South Burlington, VT that can help answer your questions about Maori Tattoos.

Aartistic Inc.
(802) 338-9009
28 Main St
Winooski, VT
 
Independent Inkworks of Vermon
(802) 864-5394
47 Main St
Burlington, VT
 
Yankee Tattoo
(802) 862-3328
198 Pearl St
Burlington, VT
 
Yankee Tattoo
(802) 862-3328
198 Pearl St
Burlington, VT

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Art For Life
(802) 257-3078
56 Elliot St
Brattleboro, VT
 
Independent Inkworks Of Vermon
(802) 864-5394
47 Main St
Burlington, VT
 
Counter Culture
(802) 660-2700
132 Church St
Burlington, VT
 
Yankee Tattoo
(802) 862-3328
198 Pearl St
Burlington, VT
 
Wolf's Den Body Piercing and Tattoo
(802) 864-5105
200 Battery St
Burlington, VT

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Tattoo Works Of Vt
(802) 527-0905
116 N Main St
Saint Albans, VT
 
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Maori / Polynesian tattoos

Polynesian tattoo designsMaori / Polynesian Tattoo Designs - Maori tattooing is a distinct school of patterns and graphic designs within Polynesian tattooing. While much of Polynesian tattooing is derived from straight-line geometric patterns (and thought to originate with patterns found on ancient Lapita pottery shards such as have been discovered in Samoa), a design fact which rose in part because the traditional Polynesian tattoo combs are best suited to linear designs, Maori tattooing is essentially curvilinear, and the mainstay of Maori designs are based on the spiral. It should be noted that renowned traditional Hawaiian artist Keone Nunes has demonstrated that it is possible to reproduce complex curved designs using traditional Polynesian tattooing implements.

Maori tattooing is distinguished by the use of bold lines and the repetition of specific design motifs that are prominent both in the tattooing or "moko" of the Maori people of New Zealand and within other cultural artworks such as carving and weaving. A traditional Maori tattoo artist -- the tohunga ta moko -- could produce two different types of pattern: that based on a pigmented line, and another, the puhoro, based on darkening the background and leaving the pattern unpigmented; as clear skin. Within Maori facial tattoos it is possible to discern two spiral patterns very similar to the fern frond, or koru, that is a repeating motif common to Maori art, including tattooing or "moko", painting and carving, in both wood, bone and greenstone.

Traditionally Maori tattoo artists followed very specific rules laid out for facial "moko" or tattoos. It is important to note that because of the tremendous cultural complexity of New Zealand's many tribes and clans, these rules often had local variations. But the idea that the tattoos followed a set of prescribed rules was widespread, and tattoos were specific to individuals, family, clans and tribes. Maori tattoos follow the contours of the face, and are meant to enhance the natural contours and expressions of an individual's face. A well-executed tattoo would trace the natural "geography" of an individual's facial features, for example lines along the brow ridge; the major design motifs are symmetrically placed within opposed design fields: lines are used in certain areas where spirals are not used; two types of spiral are used -- the koru, which is not rolled up and has a "clubbed" end, and the rolled spi...

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