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Heron Tattoos Claremore OK

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Ink Junky's Tatoos Studio Inc
(918) 272-9955
9200 N Garnett Rd
Owasso, OK
 
Tweaker'S Ink Llc
(918) 258-4653
9949 S 241st East Ave
Broken Arrow, OK
 
Electric Eye Tattoo Mysterium
(918) 835-5669
5002 E Admiral Blvd
Tulsa, OK
 
Mystical Illusions Body Piercing & Tattoo
(405) 948-8282
4417 Nw 23rd St
Oklahoma City, OK
 
Bennetts Tattooing & Body Piercing
(918) 227-6499
319 South Main Street
Sapulpa, OK
 
Secret Ink Tattoo
(918) 341-4700
314 S Lynn Riggs Blvd
Claremore, OK

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Tweaker's Ink Llc
(918) 258-4653
9949 S 241st East Ave
Broken Arrow, OK

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Oklahoma Aesthetic Institute Inc
(405) 527-5331
20556 State Highway 39
Purcell, OK
 
A Beautiful Investment
(405) 833-8900
8946 S Western Ave
Oklahoma City, OK
 
E L Jeffe Enterprises Llc
(405) 524-6824
411 Nw 23rd St
Oklahoma City, OK
 
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Heron tattoos

Heron tattoo meaningsHeron Tattoos - The Heron is an avian tattoo design that is rich in symbolism, its graceful, elongated form featured in numerous myths, tales and legends around the world. We humans have long looked at the Heron and seen aspects of ourselves reflected in this statuesque bird and its patterns of behavior.

Picture the Heron and the Crow together on a branch-one black, one white, the one peaceful, the other looking for trouble-clearly opposites, yet fable tells us that they were friends. In China and Japan, that unlikely avian duo is seen as a manifestation of the well-known yin/yang symbol.

The heron shares much the same symbolism as other wetland wading birds, such as storks, bitterns and cranes-and egrets. In fact, the heron and the egret are from the same bird family, with their long beaks, longer legs, and necks that curve down onto the back of their body when resting. Egrets, in comparison to Herons, are usually white and not as tall as their heron brothers. The heron and its cousins are widespread around the world, inhabiting wetlands and water systems on every continent and are found on islands in every ocean. Many of the species prefer warmer climates and are found in the tropics year round. Those species in colder climates generally migrate with the seasons. Herons are another species of bird that has greatly benefited from the protection and conservation of wetland habitats in many different ecosystems around the world. Destruction of the wetlands they call home is their greatest threat.

The Great Blue Heron of the Americas is the largest of the Heron species and may stand from 3.2 - 4.5 feet in height (1-1.4 meters) and have a wingspan of 5.5 - 6.6 feet (1.7 - 2 meters). Their slow, steady wing beats give herons an air of regal majesty in flight and yet they can cruise at air speeds of 20 to 30 miles per hour (32 - 48 kilometers). Although they are solitary hunters and quite territorial, Herons will breed in large colonies or rookeries. For a shore bird, their habit of resting in large trees near water seems like a departure, but it is a form of protection against predators, which includes bald eagles. The all-white version of the species seen in Florida and the Caribbean is often called the Great White Heron, but is actually a color variation of the same species.

One of the heron's most acknowledged traits is its patience. "Everything comes to the heron who waits." The Heron is an ambush predator. It is unique in that it appears to hide in plain sight, standing motionless in shallow water and undetectable to its marine prey until it strikes from above. It appears to wait for prey to come within striking distance, rather than chase it down. Its classic one-legged pose has earned it a reputation for contentment and contemplation. Early Christians saw this as a metaphor, cautioning men against chasing after false doctrines to feed their hungry souls. In similar manner, the heron's ...

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