Fish Tattoos Hamilton OH

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Tattoo Club
(513) 868-0352
812 Heaton St
Hamilton, OH
 
Tattoo Club
(513) 868-0352
812 Heaton St
Hamilton, OH
 
Lambadi City Tattoo
(513) 860-9239
6600 Dixie Hwy Ste Z2
Fairfield, OH
 
Apart Of U
(513) 887-9100
P O Box 365
Hamilton, OH
 
Aloha Tattoos
(513) 874-1176
10044 Princtn Glendl Rd
Cincinnati, OH
 
Immortal Canvas
(513) 863-4657
5573 Eureka Dr
Hamilton, OH
 
Apart of U
(513) 887-9100
184 S Fair Ave
Fairfield, OH
 
Lambadi City Tattoo
(513) 860-9239
6600 Dixie Hwy Ste Y
Fairfield, OH
 
Panama Red's Tattoo Studio
(513) 524-4599
20 W Park Pl
Oxford, OH
 
Tattoo Inc
(513) 423-8477
2112 Central Ave
Middletown, OH
 

Fish tattoos

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Fish Tattoos - Fish shrines dating back to 6000 BC in Northern Europe make it one of the most ancient symbols known to man. Around 2500 BC, the fish symbol appeared on pottery in India, reflecting the popularity of the fish deity.

For many of the world's ancient cultures the fish was the symbol of Water, Mother, and Great Goddess. Early myth relates that the fish was the vulva of Isis, who, taking the form of the fish, swallowed the penis of Osiris. The fish then stood for the feminine and her reproductive powers. The Celts also used the fish symbol as representing female sexuality and birth. In Hindu culture, the fish was a marriage symbol. When a bride first enters the house of her husband, she does so with a fish in her hand. Two fish, swimming in opposite directions, is, of course, the sign of watery Pisces .

Images of fish

Well before the appearance of our major religions, the pointed oval sign known as vesica piscis (Latin for 'fish bladder') was linked with fertility and the feminine life force. During the early Christian era, the fish was adopted as a secret code during times of persecution. Christians scratched the fish-like icon in the dust or on walls, identifying the location as a safe haven -- here was a place where they could meet without fear of betrayal. Later, this symbol was incorporated into the ritual and d�cor of the church. This same simple geometric motif is known as ichthus, the Greek word for fish, and has become a symbol for Jesus. It is used to declare an affiliation with the Christian Faith. It's seen on car decals and hanging from key chains and charm bracelets. Evolutionists inscribe the word 'Darwin' or 'Evolve' inside that pointed oval, which, to some Americans, resembles a football.

For aboriginal and indigenous peoples of the world - particularly in coastal regions -- the fish was a bountiful food source and powerful animal totem. No fish was more revered and mythologized than the salmon, symbol of abundance, fertility, and wealth. On a more mystical level, the salmon was -- and still is -- admired for its instinct and persistence, and for the determination it shows in its heroic journey upriver from the ocean to its spawning grounds, often located many hundreds of miles up freshwater rivers. The miracle of its migration to spawn and die has made it a revered symbol of courage, tenacity, steadfastness and dependability.

For the Haida people , the salmon meant prosperity and the flourishing of the tribe or clan. It appears in totemic carvings beneath the great Thunderbird and Raven. Myth relates how the Raven was dispatched to seek the great fish, after the Haida chief's daughter had seen the salmon in a dream. The Raven lured the salmon to river inlets where the oil-rich sockeye swarmed in such numbers that it was said you could walk across the river on their backs. The rest is history as the Haida and the Salmon became integral to each other's existence.

Celtic myth re...

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