Day of the Dead Tattoos Allentown PA

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Tattooing By Peter Eagle
(610) 437-3677
512 N 7Th St
Allentown, PA
 
Al's Gotham City Tattoo
(610) 776-0902
924 W Walnut St
Allentown, PA
 
Artistic Xpressions
(610) 435-8287
1825 W Tilghman St
Allentown, PA
 
Minds Eye Tatoo && Body Piercing
(610) 965-9030
515 Chestnut St Fl 1
Emmaus, PA
 
Critical Acclaim
(610) 966-8282
1301 Chestnut St
Emmaus, PA
 
Tattooing By Peter Eagle
(610) 437-3677
512 N 7th St
Allentown, PA
 
The Quillian
(610) 770-7587
614 N 19Th St
Allentown, PA
 
Al's Gotham City Tattoo
(610) 776-0902
924 W Walnut St
Allentown, PA
 
Minds Eye Tatoo & Body Piercing
(610) 965-9030
515 Chestnut St Fl 1
Emmaus, PA
 
Showtime Tattooing
(610) 264-7737
784 3Rd St
Whitehall, PA
 

Day of the Dead Tattoos

Day of the Dead images

Scholars trace the origins of the modern holiday to indigenous observances dating back thousands of years, and to an Aztec festival dedicated to a goddess called Mictecacihuatl.

Similar holidays are celebrated in many parts of the world; for example, it's a public holiday (Dia de Finados) in Brazil, where many Brazilians celebrate by visiting cemeteries and churches. In Spain, there are festivals and parades, and at the end of the day, people gather at cemeteries and pray for their loved ones who have died. Similar observances occur elsewhere in Europe and in the Philippines, and similarly-themed celebrations appear in many Asian and African cultures.

Day of the Dead images

Due to its time being close to Halloween, The "Day of the Dead" is commonly thought to be similar to Halloween, although the two holidays actually have little in common. The "Day of the Dead" is a time of celebration, where partying is very common, although this is not very well understood in the U.S. because they celebrate Halloween as a "scary" holiday, where people will put up scary decorations and have children knock on doors for candy. It can also be the same or vice-versa.

Day of the Dead images

People go to cemeteries to communicate with the souls of the departed, and build private altars, containing the favorite foods and beverages, as well as photos and memorabilia, of the departed. The intent is to encourage visits by the souls, so that the souls will hear the prayers and the comments of the living directed to them. Celebrations can take a humorous tone, as celebrants remember funny events and anecdotes about the departed.

For the Dia de los Muertos celebration, many people will get tattooed with name of a loved one no longer present. The memorial tattoo might go so far as a portrait of the deceased-but likely in the form of a skeleton. Sounds spooky to a non-believer, but it helps to accept that they're no longer in the flesh. The skeletons are brightly dressed and are usually depicted dancing or playing a guitar. Their spirit lives on! And as more people 'get it', these Day of the Dead symbols find their way onto more living bodies as tattoos.

Day of the Dead Inspiration Gallery - Click here to get inspired! Day of the Dead motifs have their own color code-pink for joy-red for blood, life, and sacrifice-purple/indigo for grie...

Day of the Dead Tattoos - The Day of the Dead (El Día de los Muertos or All Souls' Day) is a holiday celebrated in Mexico and by Latin Americans living in the United States and Canada.

The holiday focuses on gatherings of family and friends to pray for and remember friends and family members who have died. The celebration occurs on November 1st, and November 2nd in connection with the Catholic holiday of All Saints' Day which occurs on November 1st and All Souls' Day which occurs on November 2nd. Traditions include building private altars honoring the deceased, using sugar skulls, marigolds, and the favorite foods and beverages of the departed, and visiting graves with these as gifts.

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