Chinese Character Tattoos Council Bluffs IA

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Lil Bros' Tattoo
(712) 322-2344
3144 W Broadway
Council Bluffs, IA
 
Big Brain Productions
(402) 342-2885
1123 Jackson St
Omaha, NE
 
Tattoo Studio
(402) 346-7100
2447 S 14th St
Omaha, NE
 
Big Brain Productions
(402) 342-2885
1123 Jackson St
Omaha, NE
 
Waldos Tattoo Parlor
(402) 932-8650
4063 E St
Omaha, NE
 
Sundown Tattoo
(712) 322-3242
1534 Ave J
Council Bluffs, IA
 
Sundown Tattoo
(402) 345-1255
1622 S 13th St
Omaha, NE
 
Vinnie Romero
(402) 213-5622
2230 Farnam St
Omaha, NE
 
Villains Tattoos And Body Piercing
(402) 731-0202
3629 Q St
Omaha, NE
 
Villains Tattoos and Body Piercing
(402) 731-0202
3629 Q St
Omaha, NE
 

Chinese Character tattoos

Chinese Character Tattoos - A Chinese 'character' is a logogram -- meaning a sign that represents a word. A reported 50,000 of these 'hanzi' characters make up the writing system for the Chinese language. That number has been officially slashed to a more manageable 6,000.

Arguably the oldest surviving writing system in the world, the hanzi characters are said to have been invented by an official in the court of the legendary Emperor Huangdi in 2600 BC. Cangjie was his name, and he must have been indefatigable to invent such a vast number of pictograms. Most likely he collected and collated characters that were scattered throughout ancient China, and may have begun to standardize these proto-writings in order to turn them into a true writing system, the first evidence of which are inscriptions found on tortoise shells dating back to the Shang Dynasty (1766-1123 BC).

Traditional and simplified Chinese charactersThousands of years later, modern Chinese characters still bear a resemblance to the script on those famous 'Oracle Bones'.

Written in columns, the Chinese characters are read from top to bottom, and from right to left.

Among those first characters, we see depictions of common objects like a tree and moon, a hand and a foot, mountain and sun. These symbols morphed slowly over time, until a good imagination is now required to recognize the original object. Less than 5% of all Chinese characters are straight pictographs. These simple characters were then combined to form little 'stories', or affixed with an 'indicator' to form more complex characters that served to denote abstract concepts. This category of character makes up a tiny fraction of the Chinese writing system.

Most of the characters - 90% of them - are picto-phonetic compounds, meaning that they're used for their sounds instead of their meaning. The English equivalent would be drawing an 'eye' to portray 'I', 'waves' to mean 'see', and the letter 'U' for 'you'. (I see you.) In this way, Chinese is really a means to represent the spoken language.

Although Mandarin and Cantonese are two distinct languages, the writing system for each is the same. While pronunciation may be a barrier from one language to the other, the Chinese writing system has remained faithful to ancient times.

In addition, many Chinese characters were adopted according to their meaning by the Japanese and Korean languages to represent native words, disregarding pronunciation altogether.

Chinese characters are also known as si...

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