Bird of Paradise Tattoos Grand Island NE

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Smokin' Joe's Tattoos
(308) 383-5184
111 N Walnut St
Grand Island, NE
 
Skin Tight Tattoo && Body Piercing
(308) 395-8282
313 1/2 N Broadwell Av
Grand Island, NE
 
Bitchin Bob's Body Piercing
(308) 398-0451
111 N Walnut St
Grand Island, NE

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Gi Ink
(308) 383-1864
220 W 2nd St
Grand Island, NE
 
Skin Tight Tattoo & Body
(308) 395-8282
313 1/2 N Broadwell Ave
Grand Island, NE

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Smokin' Joe's Tattoos
(308) 383-5184
111 N Walnut St
Grand Island, NE
 
Skin Tight Tattoo & Body Piercing
(308) 395-8282
313 And A Half N Broadwll
Grand Island, NE
 
Smokin Joe'S Tattoo
(308) 675-0505
1404 S Locust St
Grand Island, NE
 
Revolution Custom Tattoos
(308) 398-0451
111 N. Walnut St.
Grand Island, NE
 
Skin Art Tattoo 2
(402) 494-2919
2300 Dakota Ave
South Sioux City, NE
 
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Bird of Paradise tattoos

Bird of Paradise tattoo designs Bird of Paradise Tattoo Designs - Bird of Paradise tattoo designs can be found popping up in the most interesting of places, from the artwork of Greg Irons - iconoclastic San Francisco-based tattoo artist and graphic artist in the 60's and 70's - to the traditional Japanese tattooing of previous centuries. What is the attraction? The Bird of Paradise is the 'Diva' of the avian world, the flashy cousin of the raven and crow. The Bird of Paradise was rumoured to have come from the heavenly realms, where it soared through paradise without ever touching the earth. In fact, most of the species are endemic to the forested highlands of New Guinea and nearby islands, but they can also be found in Indonesia and eastern Australia. But the bird, and its legend, have travelled far afield and captured the imagination of people and cultures around the world. It is a testament to the extraordinary beauty of this winged vision.

The Bird of Paradise is a visual extravaganza, its display plumage a cornucopia of vivid reds, oranges, yellows, blues, blacks, and iridescent greens, that stand out against its more functional feathers and the backdrop of the jungle canopy it calls home. This is the calling card of the male bird of paradise, graced with the colours of the rainbow for the purpose of attracting females, who are in comparison are dull in colour (the better to escape predators and raise her offspring in relative anonymity).

The first European to file a report on the bird of paradise had this to say about it: "It was like a meteor whose body, cutting through the air, leaves a long trail of light."

Their extravagant appearance is a symbol to some people of elaborate thoughts, a healthy disregard for worldly concerns, and even suggests a special closeness to God, or at the very least, the favor of God.

Bird of Paradise

Above all, the bird of paradise symbolizes just that - paradise -- and the miracle of life on earth. Because the bird is usually depicted in flight, those persons wearing a Bird of Paradise tattoo may be announcing to the world that their psychic kinship is with beings who prefer to 'rise above it all'.

Bird of Paradise

The Bird of Paradise is a solitary tree dweller. Each species possesses its own shrill cry or whistle, and each male keeps his own well-guarded territory. Their flight is slow, perhaps because their habitat is not far reaching, and because they are not a migratory bird. The sexes have little contact with each other outside of mating season when the male's intricate seduction display resembles a wild dance.

Bird of Paradise

National flag of Papau New GuineaNew Guineans are said to have copied the rituals of the Bird of Paradise. Their traditional dances still evoke the bird's mating exhibition, its strut and stomp and, above all, its flamboyant plumage, which is said to symbolize the spirit flying. Anthropologist Gillian Gillison says, "By wearing the feathers, you get back the part of yourself that living takes away. You capture the animal...

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