Battlefield Cross Tattoos Sun City West AZ

This page provides relevant content and local businesses that can help with your search for information on Battlefield Cross Tattoos. You will find informative articles about Battlefield Cross Tattoos, including "Battlefield Cross tattoos". Below you will also find local businesses that may provide the products or services you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Sun City West, AZ that can help answer your questions about Battlefield Cross Tattoos.

Ink Town Tattoo Studio
(623) 875-0556
12237 Nw Grand Ave
El Mirage, AZ
 
Alley
(623) 334-9698
10865 N 85Th Ave
Peoria, AZ
 
Ink Addictions
(623) 935-2950
13831 W Glendale Ave
Glendale, AZ
 
Custom Fit Tattooing && Piercin
(602) 298-4658
15224 N 59Th Ave
Glendale, AZ
 
Custom Fit Tattooing & Piercin
(602) 298-4658
15224 N 59th Ave Ste 4
Glendale, AZ
 
Ink Town Tattoo Studio
(623) 875-0556
12237 Nw Grand Ave
El Mirage, AZ
 
Ink Addictions
(623) 935-2950
13831 W Glendale Ave
Glendale, AZ
 
Alley
(623) 334-9698
10865 N 85th Ave Ste 2a
Peoria, AZ
 
Lucky Draw Tatoo
(602) 978-0412
13812 N 51St Ave
Glendale, AZ
 
Lucky Draw Tatoo
(602) 978-0412
13812 N 51st Ave
Glendale, AZ
 

Battlefield Cross tattoos

Battlefield Cross Tattoos - A battlefield cross is a makeshift memorial to a fallen or missing soldier. Built from the soldier's inverted rifle, bayonet, boots and helmet, it's not exactly a cross. Nor is it meant to mark an actual grave, since casualties are usually transported home for burial. On or close to the spot where the soldier died in action, the instant sculpture honours their ultimate sacrifice, and provides comrades with an immediate ritual by which they can begin to make sense of their loss.

As an American military tattoo, the battlefield cross motif has, for many, become a permanent memorial to loss and mourning. Also known as the 'soldier's cross' or the 'fallen soldier's cross', it has become a much more dramatic icon of loss than an image of a flag-draped coffin. Which is just as well, since the Pentagon has a media ban on photographing the arrival of coffins containing a soldier's remains.

Battlefield crossThe traditional battlefield cross is comprised of a rifle pointing downward, sometimes with the bayonet stuck in the earth, signifying that the battle (for him) is over. On the rifle's stock hangs the helmet, and perhaps the dog tags, while his upright boots form the base of this powerful memorial. We also see versions with the rifle nose-down in a heap of sandbags or mound of earth, reminiscent of Christ's cross on Calvary.

Although the elements and design of the battlefield cross presents little mystery, the origins may go all the way back to the American Civil War. It was during this time that the remains of fallen soldiers were repatriated for the first time. Bodies on the battlefield had first to be marked, and what better manner than by driving the muzzle of the soldier's gun into the earth, capped by the helmet. In subsequent military campaigns, the paying of respects to a fallen comrade at his 'cross' approximates a military honour, unofficial though it may be. Military brass came to encourage these battlefield memori...

Click here to read the rest of this article from Vanishing Tattoo