Anchor Cross Tattoos South Houston TX

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Bloodline Tattoos
(713) 242-9324
3304 Auburn St
Houston, TX
 
Slingin' Ink Tattoo
(713) 920-1906
2727 E Southmore Ave
Pasadena, TX
 
Smokin Jo's Custom Tattoos
(281) 998-8730
3910 Fairmont Pkwy Ste E
Pasadena, TX
 
Laser Tattoo Removal Inc
(713) 334-7400
7142 Fairway Dr
Houston, TX
 
Skin Deep Tatoos & Body Piercing
(281) 998-2100
6323 Spencer Hwy
Pasadena, TX
 
Smokin Jo's Custom Tattoos
(281) 998-8730
3910 Fairmont Pkwy Ste E
Pasadena, TX
 
Bloodline Tattoos
(713) 242-9324
3304 Auburn St
Houston, TX
 
Artistic Design Tattooing
(713) 643-8672
3147 Roe Dr
Houston, TX
 
Artistic Design Tattooing
(713) 643-8672
3147 Roe Dr
Houston, TX
 
Dream Works Tattoos
(713) 738-3239
5049 Reed Rd
Houston, TX
 

Anchor Cross tattoos

Anchor Cross Tattoos - For 'outsider' Christians looking for a striking, yet spiritually respectful tattoo that best captures their 'faith', the anchor cross is a highly graphic and attractive choice. Whether it originates from biblical reference, from its long use as an age-old icon, or from a Greek play on words, the anchor cross is loaded with meaning that runs fathoms deep.

For ancient Romans, the anchor was a life saver that secured a ship against storms that would otherwise dash it upon the rocks. Christians would say that it 'saves spiritual lives'. They see the anchor as a symbol of hope based on Christ's life and teaching and especially his death upon the cross. How serendipitous that the anchor and the cross are so similar in appearance and form.

The traditional anchor cross appears in various forms. One variation manages to include three crosses-by 'crossing' the two barbs of the double hook. This symbolism may represent the Holy Trinity to some, or perhaps the three crosses on Calvary.

As a nautical motif, the anchor has long implied a steady course through the stormy straits of life, or refuge in a secure harbor protected from turbulent seas and approaching storms. For some ancients, the anchor symbolized various sea gods. Such a commonplace emblem served the persecuted Roman Christians very well as a disguised cross. This crux disimmulata may have looked to all the world like an anchor, but to Christians it was a Latin cross. The anchor even had biblical credentials:

"We have this hope, a sure and steadfast anchor of the soul, a hope that enters the inner shrine behind the curtain...," from the Epistle to the Hebrews 6:19.

Some anthropologists insist that the anchor as a 'disguised cross' is a modern phenomenon. But the anchor as a religious icon-along with the fish and the palm-unquestionably dates back to early Christendom when images of Jesus were deemed pagan, and therefore forbidden.

From the Greeks comes another theory of the anchor's Christian connection. Greek liturgy is rife with the term en kurio, which translates as 'in the Lord'. It is often used in reference to believers who have 'died in the Lord'. Now follow along-the Greek word for anchor is ankura. Sounds like en kurio. Those Christians building the catacombs in Rome may have seen the 'ankura' as a means of disguising their blessings upon those who 'died in the Lord'. By the fourth century, the anchor cross had been retired in favour of the cross and crucifix.

The anchor cross is sometimes called St. Clement's Cross. Clement was an early leader of the Roman church. According to legend, he was imprisoned by a subsequent emperor, and for performing miracles in jail was sentenced to death. His executioners bound him to an anchor and tossed him into the Black Sea. His martyrdom earned him sainthood, after which he became the patron saint of anchorsmiths and mariners. The anchor cross is also known as the Mariner's Cross.

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